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Everlasting Love

I have this picture in my house; it was given to me by my mom because it is a painting of horses with Jeremiah 31:3 written on it: “I have loved you with an everlasting love.” It is a beautiful picture with a beautiful verse, and it has provoked a lot of thought over the last few years that I’ve been looking at it. I’ll tell you why.

Working with horses over the years, I’ve learned to accurately read their body language. One of the horses in the picture is displaying interest, attention, and care toward the other horse. His ears are up; head held high, eyes are bright! Everlasting love, right? Just like the verse written below it says! Read full article

Guarding our Tongue

How must we use this gift of speaking to glorify God? We must use our tongue as the lame beggar who went walking, and leaping, and praising God as a witness to all those who were around Him and were astounded by His ability to walk. We must use our tongue, even in the simplest things, to be a witness of the truth. If we fail to tell the truth when we are asked something as meaningless as how tall we are then how can we expect to be able to hold to the truth of God’s word which is offensive to many? There is also according to Ecclesiastes 3:7 “a time to keep silence.” As young people it is especially important to have this time of silence and listen to the wisdom of our parents, grandparents, and others who have wisdom from age and experience that we lack. It is also important that we use our tongue to communicate with others and God. It is essential that we communicate with God because our life in prayer is a reflection of our spiritual life.

God instructs us also that the tongue is as a devouring fire (Isaiah 30:27). Certainly, we must be careful in the use of this devouring fire. There is that use of the tongue as a fire which burns down others so we commit the sin of murder towards them and fail to be edifying in our communication. There are also many curse and swear words that, to the world, have become normal expressions. Many will say, “I know that my friends are not offended and I do not mean these words to be wickedness.” Perhaps our friends are fine with us saying things and maybe we are somewhat innocent in our use of such words, but is it acceptable before God? We always must come before God the judge, and the God whom we live our lives to glorify and please. Can we truly testify that no corrupt communication flows from our mouth, and that our conscience is holy before God?

It is a great temptation, especially given the world we live in, to say the phrases “O my God” and “O my Word”. These phrases have become the normal exclamation for surprise. God’s name is fearful and worthy of making one stop and pause with awe and respect. There is no word we can utter forth with our tongue that is as fearful as God’s name. According to the Heidelberg Catechism Q.A. 99 we must not profane or abuse the name of God. To profane something is to make it common. Therefore, the third commandment forbids any taking of God’s name and pulling it down from its lofty place. Often, we do realize that saying this phrase as an exclamation of surprise is wrong so then we change the wording a little bit and say, “O my goodness,” or “O my gosh.” It is good we try to change our bad habits, but these are not innocent phrases either. Mark 10 recounts the story of one who came running to Jesus and came to him saying good Master. Jesus said why callest thou me good for there is none good, but one, that is, God. Even Jesus would not allow someone to call him good. Should we then say O my goodness? (If you are interested Reverent Huizinga had a sermon on “Our Use of God’s Name” which spoke and gave a complete reasoning why we should avoid all phrases contained in the initials OMG. See the link below. https://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=54121718486).

May we all be active in our efforts to please God with our tongues and pray the words of Psalm 141:3-4, “Set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth; keep the door of my lips. Incline not my heart to any evil thing, to practise wicked works with men that work iniquity…”

Luke Christian Potjer

The Parable of the Sower

Think for a moment of the parable of the sower and his seed.  This is a story which most (if not all) Christians are familiar with.  The seed falls in four different locations, and in three cases it does not produce fruit for various reasons.  Sunday school classes often teach this particular parable for its simple structure – it is easy to grasp, even at a young age.  It is interesting, then, that we so readily forget it.  If you are like me, you typically think of yourself as simply the “good ground” we read of in Matthew 13:8.  This is altogether too easy a mindset for us to slip into – I’m saved; it’s all meaningless now.  Nothing I do can merit my salvation, and it’s already been bought anyway.  I’m good.  Now I just have to find the best way to produce some fruit. 

If we adopt this thinking, there is nothing here for us – this parable is totally meaningless.  We would do well to consider ourselves in connection to the other kinds of soil.  By nature, of course, we are the hard ground that the seeds are incapable of penetrating; we know this and are often willing to acknowledge it.  But we are sometimes also the other soils as well.  How often do we not make our faith overtly obvious in the best of times but then become mysteriously quiet in the face of trials?  When we do so, we are the stony soil – there is precious little foundation there, and the sun blisters and withers anything that grows.  When the seeds of offensive doctrine are sown to us by God’s Word, how do we react?  Often, we are choked out from confessing them by the thorny old man.  When the command comes to us to lead a new and godly life, the old man closes our throat with his thorny earthly pleasures and prevents us from speaking up in obedience.  Instead, we continue to live lives of utter sinfulness, drinking, lusting, and lying as we did before.

Now acknowledging our shortcomings, we can consider our ultimate place – the soft soil.  Remembering that is only by the Spirit’s continual work of sanctification in us that our inner thorns are more and more uprooted, we ought to turn to God in utter dependence and thanksgiving!  However, now that the gospel is able to take root in our hearts, the work is not at an end.  The plant must continue to grow and to produce fruit.  What better way to cause this growth than the opportunity we have tomorrow morning?  Enter into God’s house and worship Him.  When you hear the Word preached, you will grow spiritually in the warmth that is the “Sun of righteousness” (Malachi 4:2).  Jesus Christ, the living water, will enter into the roots of your faith and heart and rejuvenate you from your thirst after a long, sinful week.  Only when we have the grace of God within us are we able to produce the fruit that He demands of us.  If we fool ourselves into thinking that we can produce fruit of our own accord, we will find that we fail; it will be tainted by our self-righteous pride, and it will be rotten.  This fruit is not pleasing to God – of such He says, “I will spue thee out of my mouth” (Revelation 3:16)!  So, child of God, when you go to the house of God tomorrow, soak up the sunlight, and drink of His goodness!

Matthew Koerner
September 9, 2017

Running the Race

I recently went to a cross country meet for Covenant Christian High School (Grand Rapids, MI). For those of you who don’t know much about the sport, it’s running a distance through grass (which can slow you down more than you think). For high schoolers it is a distance of 5 kilometers (3.1 miles). Needless to say, the weather is not always perfect. Rain or shine, sleet or snow, grass or mud, they run. I was even crazy enough to run on the team for two years through high school. I loved it even though some days were tough.  Attending the meet made me realize how much I missed that atmosphere.

I was reminded again why the Bible often compares the life of a Christian to that of a runner, and participation in this sport taught me a lot of lessons for everyday life. Cross country taught me how to set goals and learn how to achieve them, thus it made me a stronger person. The Christian can and should apply this same enthusiasm to his or her spiritually life and tasks of everyday life.  Running allows you to be competitive with other teams and your fellow teammates, but it’s friendly, as we were instructed to let our light shine, even (or especially) on the running field.

Even though you are running for an individual place, there is a team spirit that comes through, no matter if you are one of the first placers, towards the middle, or at the back. Your team is there to support you and cheer for you. The body of Christ should operate in the same manner: encouraging everyone in their journey of faith; not just popular or well-known people.

Being part of a crazy cross country-loving team is one of the best things I did in high school. Yes, you have tough days and bad races, but you also have a team and friends that are ready to pick you up and help you. Even on those bad race days I liked to remind myself that it’s not the end of the world. There’s a lot of other good things in your life to be thankful for.  Like those team mates and friends that you have in your life to help you get through any struggles, running or not.  

“…and let us run with patience the race that is set before us. Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith” (Heb. 12:1c-2a).

Laura Feenstra            
November 6, 2018

Exultant Praise

God chose us before He formed the creation. He separated us out from all those whom He would create and proclaimed that He would be our God and we would be His people. He loves us now even though we daily reject the guidelines He has given us and turn instead to our old chains. What a great God we serve! Why would God choose to love us, miserable people that we are? Our great God chose to love us so that we would see His wonders and praise Him for His glorious grace. We will then praise Him who He is and what He has done for us.

What a glorious God He is! God is the King of Creation. He is sovereign over all things, and has predetermined all of history to serve His own divine will. Not only is He the original being, the Creator of all, and the sovereign King, but He is also the only source of all good. Only God is worthy to be praised. Whom else can demand the praise of men? The greatest of us are but dirt and grime in the light of His boundless power and goodness. Every good thing is given by God, and every evil thing He gives power to and directs to serve His purpose. If this Eternal King gave us nothing but punishment, He would yet be infinitely worthy of all our praise. If He had promised us hell, yet our every thought and desire could only be well directed if it served His commands.[3] He is the one and only God.

This great God is our God! This high and mighty Master of the universe came down to earth in the person of the Son. The Son, our Savior Jesus Christ, condescended to our filthy state to face every temptation and suffer the rejection of His Father, who was one with Him in being! All of our sins were erased before the sight of our righteous God as our bleeding Savior, rejected by man and by God, cried out, “It is finished!” Therefore it is not only our duty to praise our powerful Creator, but it is our joy to praise the endless mercies of our loving Father.

We praise our Father, for He has made us heirs of Christ’s reward. We praise Him, for He has blessed us with all spiritual blessings. We bring glory to the Name of our Master as we direct our every purpose, goal, though, desire, and action to the service of His people in the station He has given us. We praise Him as we do His commandments, for only He could free such sin-bound creatures as us. We praise Him after we fail to do His commandments, for we know that only He could turn such stubborn sinners back to Himself. We honor Him for His perfection, and we love Him for He first loved us.

Our Father loves us now. He has loved us from the beginning and He will love us eternally. Despite our wretched state He has purchased us to be members of Christ and live in communion with Him. He has done all of this to serve His own good pleasure, so that we would praise Him for His beauty and grace. Let us praise our King forevermore!

Seth Bleyenberg

1. Ephesians 1:5-6, “Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.”

2. Examples include: God’s use of Cyrus, emperor of Persia (Ezra 1:1-4), God’s use of Satan’s work in the book of Job, and God’s use of wicked nations to purify His people and redirect their hearts to Him (Isaiah 1:24-28)

3. Even the wicked are called to repent and believe, and therefore are called to obey God’s commands. (Matthew 22:14, “For many are called, but few are chosen.”)

4. Jesus did not face every temptation, but He was “in all points tempted like as we are,” so that He fully understands our struggles against sin. (Hebrews 4:15)

5. Ephesians 1:3, “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ:”

Exultant Praise

What a glorious God He is! God is the King of Creation. He is sovereign over all things, and has predetermined all of history to serve His own divine will. Not only is He the original being, the Creator of all, and the sovereign King, but He is also the only source of all good. Only God is worthy to be praised. Whom else can demand the praise of men? The greatest of us are but dirt and grime in the light of His boundless power and goodness. Every good thing is given by God, and every evil thing He gives power to and directs to serve His purpose. If this Eternal King gave us nothing but punishment, He would yet be infinitely worthy of all our praise. If He had promised us hell, yet our every thought and desire could only be well directed if it served His commands.[3] He is the one and only God.

This great God is our God! This high and mighty Master of the universe came down to earth in the person of the Son. The Son, our Savior Jesus Christ, condescended to our filthy state to face every temptation and suffer the rejection of His Father, who was one with Him in being! All of our sins were erased before the sight of our righteous God as our bleeding Savior, rejected by man and by God, cried out, “It is finished!” Therefore it is not only our duty to praise our powerful Creator, but it is our joy to praise the endless mercies of our loving Father.

We praise our Father, for He has made us heirs of Christ’s reward. We praise Him, for He has blessed us with all spiritual blessings. We bring glory to the Name of our Master as we direct our every purpose, goal, though, desire, and action to the service of His people in the station He has given us. We praise Him as we do His commandments, for only He could free such sin-bound creatures as us. We praise Him after we fail to do His commandments, for we know that only He could turn such stubborn sinners back to Himself. We honor Him for His perfection, and we love Him for He first loved us.

Our Father loves us now. He has loved us from the beginning and He will love us eternally. Despite our wretched state He has purchased us to be members of Christ and live in communion with Him. He has done all of this to serve His own good pleasure, so that we would praise Him for His beauty and grace. Let us praise our King forevermore!

Seth Bleyenberg

1. Ephesians 1:5-6, “Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.”

2. Examples include: God’s use of Cyrus, emperor of Persia (Ezra 1:1-4), God’s use of Satan’s work in the book of Job, and God’s use of wicked nations to purify His people and redirect their hearts to Him (Isaiah 1:24-28)

3. Even the wicked are called to repent and believe, and therefore are called to obey God’s commands. (Matthew 22:14, “For many are called, but few are chosen.”)

4. Jesus did not face every temptation, but He was “in all points tempted like as we are,” so that He fully understands our struggles against sin. (Hebrews 4:15)

5. Ephesians 1:3, “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ:”

Worthy: Gratitude & Praise (1)

Our lives are filled with thoughts and questions about worth. Is it worth it to take the time and read this article? Is this old thing worth keeping? Should I buy this object now or should I find a sale? Why did God save me when I am not worthy? We ask many questions regarding worth. From these examples we see some questions are important to think about while others are much more trivial. An important question we must ask is, of what is God worthy that I must render to Him? God is worthy that every aspect of our life be directed to Him. But it is easier to direct that life to God when we know of some things God is worthy of receiving. According to the Heidelberg Catechism (L.D 32 Q.A. 86), we must do good works, “that so we may testify by the whole of our conduct our gratitude to God for His blessings, and that He may be praised by us.” We learn here that God is worthy of gratitude and praise. We must know what these expressions truly are, and how they are related to one another.

Gratitude is perhaps the most important thing of which God is worthy. This is because all our other actions, although they are all distinct, flow from our gratitude. To understand gratitude, we can think of how we express it to one another. If a friend is given a great gift which gives him joy and fills his heart with excitement, then he might give a card or gift in return to make his generous friend happy. If expressing gratitude is the recipient of a gift giving pleasure to the faithful giver then we must know how to bring pleasure to God. Remember back to creation when God said, “Let the earth bring forth grass…And the earth brought forth grass…and God saw that it was good,” (Gen. 1:11-12).  God finds pleasure when His people, like the grass, fulfill their created purpose and give Him glory. To show our gratitude to God and please Him, we must be obedient to His holy law and give Him all glory. This faithful obedience must be revealed by our actions and flow from a heart of gratitude and love for God.

Our praise too comes from an acknowledgement for what God has done. However, it is not simply because He has given us so much that God deserves praise. It is because God is God that he is worthy of praise. Often, we find things on this earth worthy of praise because of their price or uniqueness. We may praise a house for its lavish decoration and elegant construction, but how much greater is God than the greatest thing one could ever give earthly praise and admiration to? God is worthy to receive praise because He alone is worthy of the glory that praising gives. In His essence, “God is infinitely exalted above all His creation and there is none like Him” (Hoeksema, Essentials of Reformed Doctrine, L:3).

As the children of God, we have so many reasons to give God this praise of which He is worthy. As God’s children we are not only more aware of who God is and how worthy He is, but also we feel His hand upon us bestowing us with many gifts. Yet, even with all our knowledge and experience of His blessings we still have so much to learn about God. My next few articles will continue to show what God is worthy of so that we might better render unto God that which is His.

Luke Christian Potjer

Scripture: Article 7 of the Belgic Confession-

calls the Holy Scripture “the only rule of faith.” Lord’s Day 33 of the Heidelberg Catechism, when speaking of good works, describes these works in part as only those that are “performed according to the law of God,” that is, the Scriptures. Sola Scriptura, as we were reminded in the recent celebration of the Protestant Reformation’s 500th anniversary, means that Scripture alone gives us everything we need to know for life and faith. II Timothy 3:15 teaches us that Scripture is “able to make us wise unto salvation.” Scripture indeed is important and should occupy an important place in our lives.

Why is Scripture so important? First, it is God’s Word. What could ever be more important and worth our time than the Word of our covenant Father to us? By it God reveals Himself to us so that we can know Him and live with Him in sweet fellowship.

Second, God’s Word is Jesus Christ our Savior. He made the perfect sacrifice to satisfy for the sins of all His people. Therefore when we appear before God in the final judgment, we are not condemned, but have Christ’s perfect righteousness counted as ours. There can certainly be no greater gift, no more amazing grace than that Word!

Third, Scripture gives us everything we need to live and die happily: knowledge of our sin and misery, how we can be delivered from our sin and misery, and how we can show our gratitude to God for that deliverance (Lord’s Day 1). We can only know those three things through God’s Word, which shows us our sin through the law, reveals Christ’s work on the cross for us, and instructs us in our lives of thankful obedience.

Scripture is everything for the child of God. There is never an hour or circumstance in which God’s Word is not there for us. In joy, it directs us to praise the One from whom all blessings flow. In sin, it rebukes us, calls us to repentance, and assures us of forgiveness. In sorrow, it gives us the only comfort there can ever be in life or in death, that we are not our own but belong to our faithful Savior Jesus Christ. In doubt, it shows us God’s unchanging love and faithfulness and gives us hope for the future. The following poem, by Amos R. Wells, says it nicely.

When I am tired, the Bible is my bed;
Or in the dark, the Bible is my light;
When I am hungry, it is vital bread;
Or fearful, it is armour for the fight;
Or lonely, thronging friends I find therein.

If I would work, the Bible is my tool,
Or play, it is a harp of happy sound.
If I am ignorant, it is my school;
If I am sinking, it is solid ground.
If I am cold, the Bible is my fire;
And wings, if boldy I aspire.

Should I be lost, the Bible is my guide;
Or naked, it is raiment, rich and warm.
Am I imprisoned, it is ranges wide;
Or tempest-tossed, a shelter from the storm.
Would I adventure, ‘tis a gallant sea;
Or would I rest, it is a flowery lea.

Scripture indeed is everything for the child of God, and the study of Scripture is infinitely profitable. Let us now be faithful and diligent in our use of this great gift.

Emily Feenstra 

Adultery Is Near! (1)

Every day we go about seeking to fulfill the chief end of man: to glorify God, and to enjoy Him forever (Westminster Shorter Catechism Q. &. A.1). In this walk we must have the meekness to realize that within us Satan tempts us to conform to the wickedness of the world and to forsake the call to “put on the mind of Christ” (I Cor. 2:16). A great temptation is the sin of adultery which Satan has filled the world with. He desires that we forsake God by breaking His seventh command, “Thou shalt not commit adultery,” (Ex. 20:14).

In this twenty-first century the world is so full of filth. Adultery is everywhere. Innumerable ways present themselves to fall into this sin. I only list a few: advertisements are increasingly abundant that appeal towards these sinful lusts, television programs and movies find little fault including scenes showing this sin, pornography is almost accepted as a normal form to find pleasure, walking out of the grocery store there are magazines which can tempt a passerby to look through with lust, and taking part in sexting. The devil is taking best advantage of technology to saturate the world with this age-old temptation.

What do I scroll through on Instagram, what stories do I watch on Snapchat, and what do I post? It is important we all consider these questions and meditate on them. We must even ask if there is something we liked or commented under that could be a temptation for others. We hear these warnings and we must heed to them! We are called to be blameless and our use of social media must reflect this calling (Phil. 2:15). The warnings are repeated because the temptations are repeated and grow stronger. Do not excuse this article saying, “I have already recently read something telling me of this danger.” It cannot be ignored. The devil wants you to think that you do not need a reminder. As soon as we start to think we are good enough on our own the devil strikes.

We must remain strong and “posses [our] vessel in sanctification and honour;” (I Thess. 4:3-5). This sin is not far from our church, nor is it far from us personally. It is not far from you! Each one us of must realize its danger and flee to God from this sin. We are not capable of living perfectly of ourselves. We are weak on our own and, if left to ourselves, will most definitely fall into all the snares of the devil. Many times, we try to rely on ourselves and quickly realize we have no strength. We must confess our confidence and strength is in God not of ourselves with David in Psalm 28:7, “The Lord is my strength and my shield; my heart trusted in him, and I am helped: therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth; and with my song will I praise him.”

It is God’s will for our sanctification that we abstain from fornication. May we ever realize its danger in our lives. I urge you never to give occasion to this sin for yourself or for another by any action. When we do fall and find ourselves amid trouble may we not give up hope but trust in God who will stretch forth his hand and save us (Ps. 138:7).

Adultery is Near! (2)

In my last article, I warned of the consuming sin of adultery that taints our society and is near to us in our lives. The warning was expressed so that we may take heed to ourselves, or perhaps one close to us, and repent or exhort one another to walk again in a holy life. The last article may have seemed negative having barely mentioned the salvation and grace that is afforded to us on the behalf of our Lord Jesus who offered up Himself on the cross. This article now resumes by way of Scripture to tell of that blessedness of living outside of adultery and sin in general and walking in holiness by way of the Holy Spirit.

First, we observe I Corinthians 6:9-11, “Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, not adulterers, nor effeminate…shall inherit the kingdom of God. And such were some of you: but ye are washed, but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God.” This passage speaks specifically of those who walk in stark contrast to the seventh commandment of God’s law. God despises those sins and will not tolerate them. However, by God’s work of justifying us on the basis of Christ’s work, working true repentance in us, and bringing us to live a new holy life, we can be assured that the guilt of our sins is completely taken away, and that we have been given the ability to live a holy life in the name of Jesus. God has given us this assurance and we must live in it.

Secondly, we consider the message of Revelation 3:1-6 to the church at Sardis. According to the angel’s message this church was about to die. Sardis was not exhibiting works that were pleasing unto God. The church was described as wearing defiled garments, yet they continued to wear these filthy clothes. They did not take off the dirty garments to cleanse them but found it pleasurable and convenient to keep wearing them. The angel urged them to remember their first love. The church was called to remember the zeal they once had for the word that caused them to be consumed in the studying and praising of God. The church was called to cleanse those defiled garments or perhaps get rid of them entirely to prevent any remembrance of them. The blessedness of this passage is revealed in verse four, “Thou hast a few names even in Sardis which have not defiled their garments; and they shall walk with me in white: for they are worthy.” We may at times fall away into these sins, undoubtedly, we all have walked in adultery in some way or another, but as we observed in I Corinthians 6 God smiles upon us when we flee unto Him and resist sin and temptation with our whole heart.

As children of God, we always have hope. We never need to feel overcome and taken over by sins such as adultery. The Bible does not say that Christ came for the perfect. If it were so, then His people would not need Him. Our Lord and Savior came for those whom His Father gave Him, and He loves (Luke 5:32). Our calling as you may remember is to “possess [our] vessel in sanctification and honor” (I Thess. 4:3-5). If we do fail and possess our vessel in dishonor then we must repent and flee unto God our rock.

The blessedness of man according to David is that our iniquity is forgiven, our sins are covered, and the Lord does not attribute sin to us (Rom. 4:6-8). May we joyfully and thankfully live in our calling given in I Peter 1:15, “But as he which hath called you is holy, be ye holy in all manner of [living].”

Luke Christian Potjer

“Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls” (Matt. 11:28-30).

How comforting these words of our Lord Jesus Christ are to all his elect! Come unto me and I will give you rest. It seems that sometimes that is all we wish for in our busy lives – just a little rest. We can find ourselves so caught up in the stress and business of life that it can be so hard to find even a small window of time to enjoy some peace and quiet. The pile of papers continues to grow, deadlines loom nearer and nearer, and the to-do list seems to go on endlessly. When will you ever find the time to just relax?

But that’s not the kind of rest that Christ is speaking of here. “Come unto me… and ye shall find rest unto your souls.” The rest our Lord promises is rest in the truest sense – not a mere break from physical labor that replenishes our earthly energy for a brief time, but a lasting spiritual relief for the soul from the constant battle it wages in this life. Daily we struggle with fierce spiritual enemies that attack us from every side as we fight the good fight of faith. Satan and his hosts lurk around every corner, poised with fiery darts to hurl at us when we are least expecting it. The world tempts us to abandon the straight and narrow path, sweetly inviting us to “have a little fun.” But when, by the grace of God, their invitation holds no appeal to us and we refuse to join in their revelings, we are faced with hateful mocking and ridicule. And perhaps most taxing on the soul is the sin residing within ourselves. Daily we must fight against our own sinful natures that are part of who we are. A constant war wages within our own beings – the old man of sin versus the new man of regeneration,  so that we confess with the apostle Paul, “For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do” (Rom. 7:19). Truly we need rest!

And truly our Savior Jesus Christ is the only place we can truly find rest. He is our High Priest who is touched with the feeling of our infirmities.  He was “in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Heb. 4:15). He is the sole source of our rest and comfort for He made Himself a propitiatory sacrifice on account of our sins and imputes His perfect righteousness to our account before the Almighty Judge of heaven and earth. He gave us the ultimate victory over all our spiritual enemies and daily gives us the strength to fight the battle of faith through His poured-out Spirit. And one day He will bring us to be with Him in everlasting heavenly rest and covenant fellowship with God in heaven. That final reality is not ours yet, but we do have a small foretaste of that heavenly rest here on this earth. Every week when we enter God’s house of worship, we receive a small glimpse of the perfection that is to come. We sing His praises with fellow saints, come before the throne of God in prayer, and hear the voice of our Lord through the preaching of the gospel. When we hear and receive the preaching, we hear Christ. And doing so, we come unto Him and receive rest for our weary and heavy-laden souls. So let’s prepare ourselves to enter into that rest tomorrow. Prepare yourself to lay your burden at the cross and be comforted. Come unto Him and you will find rest for your soul. YoungCalvinists

Anna Langerak

“For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men,” Titus 2:11
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